Second Nature logo

US

Nutrition

How to make omelettes healthy

title

Jump to: Are omelettes healthy? | Healthy omelette recipes developed by our dietitians | Mini omelettes | Classic omelette

Historically, omelettes haven’t always been regarded as a healthy meal. The fear that fat and dietary cholesterol in eggs ‘cause heart disease’ has meant that eggs have had a bad reputation.

Click here to find out more about the connection between cholesterol and heart disease.

Are omelettes healthy? Absolutely.

We now know that the cholesterol within eggs has very little effect on the body’s blood cholesterol levels. They’re also a rich source of vitamin A, iodine, and selenium and their high protein and fat content will help you feel fuller and more satisfied until your next meal, which can support weight loss.

Adding additional ingredients to your omelette, such as fresh vegetables, can add more essential nutrients and fibre to your diet that help support your health in the long term.

At Second Nature, we’re all about what we can add to your diet rather than what to avoid. If you’d like to join over 150,000 people like Jo – who’ve improved their health while finding food freedom – click here to take our health quiz.

Healthy omelette recipes developed by our dietitians

Our team of dietitians and nutritionists have developed over 400 recipes for our Second Nature app. The following omelette recipes are rich in protein, fat, essential vitamins and minerals, and can help you on your weight loss and health journey.

We’ve got two recipes for you:

  1. Mini omelettes: perfect to batch cook for the lunch box or to store in the fridge for a healthy snack.
  2. Classic omelette: this is to use as your foundation recipe; fill the omelette with whatever combination of ingredients you like. Some ideas:
      • Roasted courgettes, red onions, and peppers
      • Bacon and cheese
      • Spinach and ricotta
      • Grated carrot, spring onion, and coriander
      • Mushroom and cream cheese

Want to make losing weight feel easier?

The Second Nature app uses behavioural science to retrain your mind to make healthy choices automatically, so these stick in the long run. Join 150,000 people who’ve used Second Nature to make losing weight feel easier - the first step is to create your personalised plan with our quick quiz.

1) Mini omelettes

Prep and cooking time: 45mins-1hr
Serves: 4

Play our video here

Ingredients

2 tsp extra virgin olive oil

1 small onion, finely diced

1 red pepper, diced

1 large tomato, diced

2-3 handfuls spinach, roughly chopped

1 tbsp sun-dried tomatoes, finely sliced (optional)

8 medium or large eggs

125ml milk

1⁄2 tsp ground paprika

1⁄2 tsp chilli powder

60g Cheddar cheese, grated

Method

Preheat the oven to 160°C/140°C fan/gas mark 4.

Heat 1 tsp of the oil in a frying pan, over medium heat. Fry the onion, pepper, and tomato for 8mins, or until soft.

Add the spinach, mix well, and cook for 2mins. Remove from the heat and add the sun-dried tomatoes (if using).

Break the eggs into a large bowl. Add the milk, paprika, chilli, salt, and pepper. Mix well with a fork or whisk.

Lightly oil a 12 cup muffin tin, with the other tsp of oil. Divide the vegetables evenly between the 12 cups. Carefully fill the cups with the egg mix and top with grated cheese.

Bake for 15-20mins, until the omelettes are just cooked through and slightly browned on the top. Free recipe

2) Classic omelette

Prep and cooking time: 15mins
Serves: 1

Ingredients

2-3 medium or large eggs

2 tbsp plain natural or Greek yoghurt

1 small handful fresh or dried herbs (optional)

1-2 handfuls your choice of vegetables, diced

1 tbsp butter

40g Cheddar cheese, grated

Method

Gently whisk the eggs in a small bowl with yoghurt and a pinch of salt and pepper (and any dried herbs).

Heat a non-stick frying pan, over medium heat. If you’re adding any vegetables, cook these in a drizzle of olive oil for 2-3mins to soften. Transfer to a side dish.

Add the butter to the pan. When it’s melted (but not browned), pour the egg mix in. Once the mixture starts to set, tilt the pan and use a spatula to lift the edges slightly to allow the raw egg to flow underneath.

Distribute the cooked vegetables, cheese, and/or fresh herbs over the top. If your pan has a lid, put it on, but this isn’t essential.

When the omelette starts to firm up around the edges, tilt the pan and fold it over in half.

Serve immediately.

You might also like

How does alcohol cause weight gain?

How does alcohol cause weight gain?

Is the paleo diet healthy?

Is the paleo diet healthy?

7 ways to lose weight without counting calories

7 ways to lose weight without counting calories

Woman holding phone with Second Nature

Become a Second Nature member

Join today and pay what you like for the first 2 weeks.

Write a response

As seen on

The GuardianThe TimesChannel 4The Sunday Telegraph
Evening Standard
Metro